The Mayfair Antiques & Fine Art Fair

The Goddess Diana, Italian, mid-18th century Roman School oil on canvas 24" x 32" framed with an English 18th century, carved and gilded frame £20,000 from Atelier Limited In Roman mythology Diana, meaning heavenly or divine, was the goddess of the hunt, the moon and childbirth. She also had the ability to talk to and control animals and was one of three maiden goddesses, along with Minerva and Vesta, who swore never to marry. She was equivalent to the Greek goddess Artemis and considered to be the twin sister of Apollo, their parents being Zeus and Leto. Worshipped by the ancient Romans, Diana provided artists with ample subject matter and here she is depicted as the huntress in a woodland setting, the moon adorning her hair with two faithful hounds beside her.

The first quality London antiques fair of the new year, The Mayfair Antiques & Fine Art Fair opens its doors for the sixth consecutive year at the five star London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square, London W1K 6JP from Thursday 4 to Sunday 7 January 2018 with the support of Wetherell, Bold & Reeves, The Clubhouse, and NFU Mutual Godalming.  Organised by The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited, this prestigious boutique event brings together some 40 expert dealers, mainly members of BADA or LAPADA The Association of Art & Antiques Dealers.   This popular fair had people jetting in from abroad from the start and continues to woo collectors, interior decorators, the trade, Londoners and visitors to the capital at the end of the festive season.

At the beginning of each year, the ballroom area of the London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square becomes a cornucopia of eclectic items for interiors and more.  19th century European bronzes sit alongside contemporary wildlife sculpture, Art Nouveau and Art Deco figures and six foot tall leporine minstrels.  18th and 19th century British and European figurative, landscape and marine paintings, by well known artists of their day, or a mid-18th century Roman School Old Master of The Goddess Diana, depicted as the huntress in a woodland setting, cater to the more traditional interior, whilst a vibrant acrylic abstract by John Hoyland, a signed lithograph by Tracey Emin or giant canvases by Greek artist Angelos are perfect for large wall spaces in offices or modern homes.

Antiques and art glass of various shapes, sizes and colours includes giant sized Emile Gallé cameo glass vases, whilst magnificent chandeliers, electroliers and storm lamps with coloured glass offer different lighting options. Traditional Persian carpets pep up many a room, often matched with fine Georgian rosewood, mahogany and oak furniture. Chinese carved coral and turquoise, antique ceramics and tiles add decorative pops of colour.  Art Deco and mid 20th century furniture and interior accessories fulfil the current trends. Functional focal points can be achieved through French ormolu, English bracket and carriage clocks, bringing an interior scheme alive.

Do visit the fair for a recce or take along your client to peruse all that is on offer.  Please email design@adfl.co.uk to request a complimentary invitation admitting up to three people.  Further information from www.mayfairfair.com

 

A late 17th century Italian painted and gilded walnut armchair with 18th century needlepoint. 47″ (120cm) high x 28″ (71cm) wide x 24″ {60cm), £2,750 from Walton House Antiques
Seat height 18″ (46cm)

 

New York [VI.1970], 1970 by John Hoyland
acrylic on canvas, signed and dated verso
60.5 x 100.5 cm
£48,000 from Tanya Baxter Contemporary

A French Empire bronze and ormolu mantel clock, c.1810, £3,975 from Richard Price. This clock has silk suspension movement with white enamel dial set in the body of an urn, raised on square base, surmounted by an armillary sphere.

 

Venetian Festival by Sir William Russell Flint (1880-1969), watercolour, 47cm x 66cm, 1963, £99,000 from Paul Mayhew Fine Art

 

Yemen by Angelos, 2014
oil on canvas
160cm x 110cm
£90,000 from MaCa

 

A large Emile Gallé cameo vase, depicting a riot of blooming cineraria, in greens, blues and yellow, approx. 9″ across x 7″ high, signed, c1900, £3,950 from M&D Moir

 

An Art Deco cocktail cabinet in the modernist style, designed by Maurice Adams, English, 152cm high x 122cm wide x 65cm deep, c.1930, £9,800 from Jeroen Markies Art Deco. This cabinet has geometric patterning in figured straight grain walnut and satin birch, original chromed metal lock and handles, and stepped side panelling. The double doors open onto a mirrored interior with bottle holders and original spirit measures, lower shelving and drawers with a satin birch lined integral slide tray.

A pair of Fuji Meibo 15×80 marine binoculars on later extending wood and brass stand with chromed conical feet, Japanese, stamped Fuji Meibo and numbered, 1m – 1.5m high with stand, barrel 32cm long, total 50cm long x 23cm wide, c.1940, £8,900 from Jeroen Markies Art Deco 15x magnification with 80mm objective lens. Paint stripped and metal polished. Fully refurbished optics.

 

The Minstrels – Piper by Clare Trenchard (b.1956, UK)
bronze
edition 1/7
72″ x 43″
Priced in the region of £25,000 from Flying Colours Gallery

 

A fine pair of silver plated and cut glass electroliers by F&C Osler, English, 15″ (38cm) high x 6½” (16.5cm) wide, c.1900, £4,950 from Fileman Antiques. The electrolier made in three sections richly cut in different styles the lower finial removable to access the light bulb. The pair of fittings are listed in an F&C Osler catalogue dated 1905.

 

The Goddess Diana, Italian, mid-18th century Roman School oil on canvas 24" x 32" framed with an English 18th century, carved and gilded frame £20,000 from Atelier Limited In Roman mythology Diana, meaning heavenly or divine, was the goddess of the hunt, the moon and childbirth. She also had the ability to talk to and control animals and was one of three maiden goddesses, along with Minerva and Vesta, who swore never to marry. She was equivalent to the Greek goddess Artemis and considered to be the twin sister of Apollo, their parents being Zeus and Leto. Worshipped by the ancient Romans, Diana provided artists with ample subject matter and here she is depicted as the huntress in a woodland setting, the moon adorning her hair with two faithful hounds beside her.

The Goddess Diana, Italian, mid-18th century Roman School
oil on canvas
24″ x 32″
framed with an English 18th century, carved and gilded frame
£20,000 from Atelier Limited
In Roman mythology Diana, meaning heavenly or divine, was the goddess of the hunt, the moon and childbirth. She also had the ability to talk to and control animals and was one of three maiden goddesses, along with Minerva and Vesta, who swore never to marry. She was equivalent to the Greek goddess Artemis and considered to be the twin sister of Apollo, their parents being Zeus and Leto. Worshipped by the ancient Romans, Diana provided artists with ample subject matter and here she is depicted as the huntress in a woodland setting, the moon adorning her hair with two faithful hounds beside her.

 

 

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