CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN KOKKEDAL

Henning Larsen Architects  and a team consisting of Orbicon, SLA and Centre for Sports and Architecture have made it to the second phase of a competition about Denmark’s largest climate change adaptation project in Kokkedal in North Zealand. The vision of the project is to show how local management of rain water and flooding can be combined with the creation of recreational values and new, active meeting spaces for the citizens.

Henning Larsen Architects’ proposal ’Kokkedal New Paths’ is one of two projects moving on to the second phase of the competition. The proposal suggests how to turn an urgent problem with flooding and huge amounts of rain into an asset to today’s suburb.

The proposal is based on the most recent research in sustainable city development and urban design. Based on studies of daylight, wind conditions and other microclimatic conditions, the recreational potential in the existing urban spaces have been improved. The redesigned urban spaces form the basis of initiatives combining recreational values with optimised rain water management.

The competition is a part of a large climate project launched by the Municipality of Fredensborg in collaboration with Realdania, The Danish Foundation for Culture and Sports Facilities and the common housing associations in Kokkedal.

On 23 August 2012 an exhibition of the finalist’s projects was inaugurated in Egeparken, Kokkedal. The exhibition causes the citizens of the Municipality of Kokkedal to discuss the two projects that have made it to the second phase. Any comments given will be included in the last part of the competition in order for the competing teams and the judges to take the suggestions of the inhabitants into consideration.

The exhibition is held at Egeparken, Holmegårdsvej 1B, Kokkedal from Wednesday 22 August 2012 to Thursday 13 September 2012.  www.henninglarsen.com/

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